Your Ancestral Heritage in a Landfill

But what if you want to pass along the bigger picture of your assembled and connected ancestral heritage?

Now into my third decade growing the Family Forest® connection service, I can’t begin to count how many times I’ve heard variations on the very same story. It goes like this.

My ________ (parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, etc.) had been researching and assembling our family history for decades. After she/he passed and the house was being prepared for estate liquidation, my ________ (sibling, aunt, uncle, cousin, etc.) threw it out with all of the other stuff they thought was just worthless accumulations.

I recently spoke with an elderly gentleman who knew this story, and he was trying to prevent it from happening to his descendants, both living and unborn. He already knew that his children and grandchildren had little or no interest in his/their family history, yet.

And Sam had great stories to pass along. At least two of his ancestors were well-documented to have performed valuable services in the founding of our country, and to have personally known George Washington.

So he joined the SAR. Joining a hereditary society is a great first step in passing along a part of your ancestral history to future generations of your descendants.

The reason that I say a part of your ancestral history is because each hereditary society has a particular interest area that they excel at. This valuable focus prevents them from including all of the parts of your ancestral heritage that are outside of their interest area, no matter how interesting those parts are to you and your descendants.

You can join multiple hereditary societies, and pass along multiple parts of your ancestral heritage, in separated parts.

But what if you want to pass along the bigger picture of your assembled and connected ancestral heritage?

You can use the Family Forest® connection service.

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